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Author Guidelines

1. GENERAL

1.1 Presentation

Articles must be accompanied by an abstract of no more than 200 words, unless otherwise specified in the CFP. Articles are supposed to be between 5,000­-7,000 words long, including footnotes and/or endnotes, but excluding the bibliography. Articles can be submitted in both Irish and English.

1.2 Format

All submissions must be Times New Roman, black font, 12pt for the main body of the text and 14pt bold for main headings, 12pt bold for sub­headings. Heading must be centred, sub­headings left­aligned. All articles must be justified. Both text and foot­ or endnotes should be typed single­spaced. A4 format must be used, with 2,54 cm at all margins. Page numbers must be placed at the top right of the header. A new paragraph must be indented by 1,27 cm unless it is a longer quotation (see Quotations below).

1.3 Spelling

Aigne accepts both British and American spelling, but consistency with regard to this must be observed and is a criterion for peer review. Quotations must, however, be kept in the original spelling, even if the spelling of the main text is different, i.e. if a British author is quoted, then the quotation must be left unchanged even if the article is written in American English.

1.4 Quotations

A quotation which is up to, but no longer than, twenty words can be enclosed in the flow of the main text; it must be placed in double quotation marks. A quotation within a quotation should be placed in single quotation marks. Quotations exceeding the twenty­word limit must be placed as a separate paragraph and must be indented on the left and right. Indentations should be 1cm on each side and have a font size of 11pt. No quotation marks should be used for longer quotations.

1.5 Translations

All quotations in foreign languages should be accompanied by a Modern English translation, which should be enclosed in double quotation marks and placed in a footnote. Translations of quoted poetry should likewise be enclosed in double quotation marks and placed in a footnote. Poetry in footnotes should be printed in continuous prose and should indicate line breaks with a forward slash. E.g. “This is line one of the poem, / and this is the second line; / this is the final quoted line”. The reference to the work cited should always follow the translation. Quotations within a footnote should likewise be followed by their reference. The translation should then appear in double quotations marks and in round brackets (with no colon or comma preceding the brackets) and the reference to the translation placed into the brackets as well, separated from the translation by a comma.

1.6 Numbers

Numbers should be written as words up to one hundred, and if not within a specific reference or measurement or other mathematical data, e.g. the twenty-first century, but 21% if part of extensive statistical data.

1.7 Text figures (including maps)

Aigne has no restriction with regard to the number of text figures. It is the responsibility of the contributor to obtain permission for the reproduction of any image from the authority holding the copyright.

Text figures (including maps) should be separate from the typescript of the text itself, and clearly identified. Ideally, you should supply figures, which have been drawn professionally. Any wording incorporated in the figure itself, e.g. in a key explaining symbols, should accord in spelling, punctuation etc., with the above conventions. All images and maps must be captioned.

 

 

2. SYSTEMS OF REFERENCE

All information regarding referencing refers to the Harvard system and has been taken from https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm

 

2.1 In­text references

Any in-text reference should include the authorship and the year of the work. Depending on the nature of the sentence/paragraph that is being written, references to sources may be cited in the text as described below.
Additional support on how to introduce such references is available from Student Support in their guide.

2.1.1 Author’s name cited in the text

When making reference to an author's whole work in your text, it is sufficient to give the name followed by the year of publication of their work:

When writing for a professional publication, it is good practice to make reference to other relevant published work. This view has been supported by Cormack (1994).

However, where you are mentioning a particular part of the work, and making direct reference to this, a page reference should be included:

Cormack (1994, pp.32-33) states that "when writing for a professional readership, writers invariably make reference to already published works".

According to Cormack (1994, pp.32-33), writers should be encouraged to reference published research when addressing professional readership.

An indirect reference

During the mid-twenties research undertaken in professional publishing (Cormack, 1994) showed that...

2.1.2 Author’s name not cited directly in the text

If you make reference to a work or piece of research without mentioning the author in the text then both the author’s name and publication year are placed at the relevant point in the sentence or at the end of the sentence in brackets:

Making reference to published work appears to be characteristic of writing for a professional audience (Cormack, 1994).

2.1.3 More than one author cited in the text

Where reference is made to more than one author in a sentence, and they are referred to directly, they are both cited:

Smith (1946) and Jones (1948) have both shown ...

2.1.4 Two or three authors for a work

When there are two or three authors for a work, they should be noted in the text

Directly using an and
White and Brown (2004) in their recent research paper found ...

Or indirectly

Recent research (White and Brown, 2004) suggests that.....

Other examples using two or three authors............

During the mid-nineties research undertaken in Luton (Slater and Jones, 1996) showed that ...

Further research (Green, Harris and Dunne, 1969) showed

When there are two or three authors for a work they should all be listed (in the order in which their names appear in the original publication), with the name listed last preceded by an and.

2.1.5 Four or more authors for a work

Where there are several authors (four or more), only the first author should be used, followed by et al. meaning and others:

Green, et al. (1995) found that the majority ...

or indirectly:

Recent research (Green, et al., 1995) has found that the majority of ...

2.1.6 More than one author not cited directly in the text

List these at the relevant point in the sentence or at the end of the sentence, putting the author’s name, followed by the date of publication and separated by a semi-colon and within brackets.

Where several publications from a number of authors are referred to, then the references should be cited in chronological order (i.e. earliest first):

Further research in the late forties (Smith, 1946; Jones, 1948) led to major developments ...

Recent research (Collins, 1998; Brown, 2001; Davies, 2008) shows that

2.1.7 Several works by one author in different years

If more than one publication from an author illustrates the same point and the works are published in different years, then the references should be cited in chronological order (i.e. earliest first):

as suggested by Patel (1992; 1994) who found that ...

or indirectly:

research in the nineties (Patel, 1992; 1994) found that ...

2.1.8 Several works by one author in the same year

If you are quoting several works published by the same author in the same year, they should be differentiated by adding a lower case letter directly, with no space, after the year for each item:

Earlier research by Dunn (1993a) found that...but later research suggested again by Dunn (1993b) that ...

If several works published in the same year are referred to on a single occasion, or an author has made the same point in several publications, they can all be referred to by using lower case letters (as above):

Bloggs (1993a; 1993b) has stated on more than one occasion that ...

2.1.9 Chapter authors in edited works

References to the work of an author that appears as a chapter, or part of a larger work, that is edited by someone else, should be cited within your text using the name of the contributory author not the editor of the whole work.

In his work on health information, Smith (1975) states ...

In the reference at the end of your document, you should include details of both the chapter author followed by the details of the entire work

Smith, J., 1975. A source of information. In: W. Jones, ed. 2000. One hundred and one ways to find information about health. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Ch.2.

2.1.10 Corporate authors

If the work is by a recognised organisation and has no personal author then it is usually cited under the body that commissioned the work. This applies to publications by associations, companies, government departments etc. such as Department of the Environment or Royal College of Nursing.

It is acceptable to use standard abbreviations for these bodies, e.g. RCN, in your text, providing that the full name is given at the first citing with the abbreviation in brackets:

First citation:

... following major pioneering research in 2006 undertaken by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) it has been shown that ...

Second citation:

More recently the RCN (2012) has issued guidelines for ...

Note that the full name is the preferred format in the reference list. These should provide the full name ...

Royal College of Nursing, 2006. Children in the Community. London: RCN.

Royal College of Nursing, 2007. Administering intravenous therapy to children in the community setting: Guidance for nursing staff. London: RCN.

Some reports are written by specially convened groups or committees and can be cited by the name of the committee:

Committee on Nursing (1972)

Select Committee on Stem Cell Research (2002)

Note there are some exceptions to this such as:

BBC Philharmonic Orchestra BBC News

where the abbreviations or initials form part of the official name.

2.1.11 No author

If the author cannot be identified use Anonymous or Anon. and the title of the work and date of publication. The title should be written in italics.

Every effort should be made to establish the authorship if you intend to use this work as supporting evidence in an academic submission:

Marketing strategy (Anon., 1999)

2.1.12 No date

The abbreviation n.d. is used to denote this:
Smith (n.d.) has written and demonstrated ...

or indirectly:

Earlier research (Smith, n.d.) demonstrated that ...

Every effort should be made to establish the year of publication if you intend to use this work as supporting evidence in an academic submission.
For further advice see Section 9 References with missing details

2.1.13 Page numbers

Including the page numbers of a reference will help readers trace your sources. This is particularly important for quotations and for paraphrasing specific paragraphs in the texts:

Lawrence (1966, p.124) states “we should expect ...”

or indirectly:

This is to be expected (Lawrence, 1966, p.124) ...

Please note page numbers: preceded with p. for a single page and pp. for a range of pages.

2.1.14 Quoting portions of published text

If you want to include text from a published work in your piece of work then the sentence(s) must be included within quotation marks, and may be introduced by such phrases as:

the author states that “........”

or

On the topic of professional writing and referencing Cormack and Brown (1994, p.32) have stated...“When writing for a professional readership, writers invariably make reference to already published works...”

In order for a reader to trace the quoted section it is good practice to give the number of the page where the quotation was found. You may also indent quotations, but should consult your Faculty, for guidance and the relevant Academic Regulations.

the author writes that “........”

2.1.15 Secondary sources(second-hand references)

You may come across a summary of another author’s work in the source you are reading, which you would like to make reference to in your own piece of work, this is called secondary referencing.

A direct in-text citation would be:

Research recently carried out in the Greater Manchester area by Brown (1966 cited in Bassett, 1986, p.142) found that ...

In this example, Brown is the work which you wish to refer to, but have not read directly for yourself. Bassett is the secondary source, where you found the summary of Brown’s work.

An indirect in-text citation would be:

(Brown, 1966 cited in Bassett, 1986, p.142)

It is important to realise that Bassett may have taken Brown’s ideas forward, and altered their original meaning. If you need to cite a secondary reference it is recommended that, where possible, you read the original source for yourself rather than rely on someone else’s interpretation of a work. For this reason it is best to avoid using secondary referencing.

The reference list at the end of your document should only contain works that you have read. In the above example you would only list the work by Bassett.

2.1.16 Tables and diagrams

When using selected information from a table or diagram, or reproducing an entire table or diagram, a reference must be made to the source.

In the following example, information is from a table found on p267 of the book Management in the media: decision makers by Robert Brown published in 2005. The original source of the data used in the table in Brown’s book was the National Statistics Office, 1985.

If you quote from this table in the text of your essay - treat as secondary referencing:

... historical figures demonstrate that only sixty percent of households had televisions in Britain by the 1970s (National Statistics Office, 1985 cited in Brown, 2005, p. 267).

If you reproduce the table in your essay: replicate the whole table, and add a citation below the table to acknowledge where the table was found

Television ownership in England and Wales (Percentage of households)

Year

1970

1980

Percentage

60

70

Source: National Statistics Office, 1985

National Statistics Office, 1985 cited in Brown, 2005, p.267.

Finally include the full details of the source, in this case the book in your reference list:

Brown, R., 2005. Management in the media: decision makers. 4th ed. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.

2.1.17 Websites

When citing material found on a website, you should identify the authorship of the website. This may be a corporate author - an organisation or company; a clue to this can be found by looking at the URL or web address. To find the date of publication, reference to this might be found at the bottom of a web page relating to copyright, or from a date headline.

 

Recent research on meningitis (BBC, 2016) has shown ...

 

2.2 COMPILING THE REFERENCE LIST

All items should be listed alphabetically by author or authorship, regardless of the format whether, books, websites or journal articles etc. Where there are several works from one author or source they should be listed together, in date order, with the earliest work listed first.

2.2.1 Books with one author

Use the title page, not the book cover, for the reference details. Only include the edition where it is not the first. A book with no edition statement is most commonly a first edition.

The required elements for a book reference are:

Author, Initials., Year. Title of book. Edition. (only include this if not the first edition) Place of publication* (this must be a town or city, not a country): Publisher.

Redman, P., 2006. Good essay writing: a social sciences guide. 3rd ed. London: Open University in assoc. with Sage.

An in-text reference for the above examples would read:

Organisations have been found to differ (Baron, 2008) when there is ...

Leading social scientists such as Redman (2006) have noted ...

*Place of publication can generally be found on the back of the title page in the address of the publishing company. Where there are several locations, choose the UK one in preference to other. Please note where there is likely to be confusion with UK place names; for USA towns include the State in abbreviated form e.g. Birmingham, Alabama would be... Birmingham, AL.

2.2.2 Books with multiple authors

For books with multiple authors, all* the names should all be included in the order they appear in the document. Use an and to link the last two multiple authors.

*Additional Advice for documents with very large numbers of authors.
Some documents have very large numbers of authors, particularly in certain disciplines. Where there are a very large numbers of authors and a wish not to include them all in a reference list, it is recommended that advice from the Faculty is sought, to establish if it is permitted to cite only a reduced number.

The required elements for a reference are:

Authors, Initials., Year. Title of book. Edition. (only include this if not the first edition) Place: Publisher.

Reference

Adams, R.J., Weiss, T.D. and Coatie, J.J., 2010. The World Health Organisation, its history and impact. London: Perseus.

Barker, R., Kirk, J. and Munday, R.J., 1988. Narrative analysis. 3rd ed. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

An in-text reference for the above examples would read:

Leading organisations concerned with health (Adams, Weiss and Coatie, 2010) have proved that............

A new theory (Barker, Kirk and Munday, 1988) has challenged traditional thinking ...

2.2.3 Books which are edited

For books which are edited, give the editor(s) surname(s) and initials, followed by ed. or eds.

The required elements for a reference are:
Author, Initials. ed., Year. Title of book. Edition. Place: Publisher.

Keene, E. ed., 1988. Natural language. Cambridge: University of Cambridge Press.

Silverman, D.F. and Propp, K.K. eds., 1990. The active interview. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Allouche, J. ed., 2006. Corporate social responsibility, Volume 1: concepts, accountability and reporting. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

2.2.4 Chapters of edited books

For chapters of edited books the required elements for a reference are:

Chapter author(s) surname(s) and initials., Year of chapter. Title of chapter followed by In: Book editor(s) initials first followed by surnames with ed. or eds. after the last name. Year of book. Title of book. Place of publication: Publisher. Chapter number or first and last page numbers followed by full- stop.

References

Samson, C., 1970. Problems of information studies in history. In: S. Stone, ed. 1980. Humanities information research. Sheffield: CRUS. pp.44-68.

Smith, J., 1975. A source of information. In: W. Jones, ed. 2000. One hundred and one ways to find information about health. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Ch.2.

An in-text reference for the above examples would read:

(Samson, 1970) (Smith, 1975)

2.2.5 Multiple works by the same author

Where there are several works by one author and published in the same year they should be differentiated by adding a lower case letter after the date.

Remember that this must also be consistent with the citations in the text

For multiple works the required elements for a reference are:
Author, Initials., Year followed by letter. Title of book. Place: Publisher.

Soros, G., 1966a. The road to serfdom. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Soros, G., 1966b. Beyond the road to serfdom. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Works by the same author should be displayed in the order referenced in your assignment, earliest first (as above).

An in-text reference for the above example would read:

(Soros, 1966a)

(Soros, 1966b)

This also applies if there are several authors with the same surname. As an alternative their initials can be included in the citation.

(Soros, G. 1966a) (Soros, G. 1966b) (Soros, M. 1966)

So in the above example, you have sources written by George Soros and also by Manuel Soros. In the full reference list you would list them in alphabetic order.

Where there are several works by one author, published in different years, these should be arranged in chronological order, with the earliest date first.

2.2.6 Books – translations/imprints/reprints

For works which have been translated, the reference should include details of the translator, the suggested elements for such references being:

Author, Initials., Year. Title of book. Translated from (language) by (name of translator, initials first, then surname). Place of publication: Publisher.

Canetti, E., 2001. The voices of Marrakesh: a record of a visit. Translated from German by J.A.Underwood. San Francisco: Arion.

For major works of historic significance, the date of the original work may be included along with the date of the translation:

Kant, I., 1785. Fundamental principles of the metaphysic of morals. Translated by T.K. Abbott., 1988. New York: Prometheus Books.

For works in another language, reference these in the same manner as an English language work but provide a translation. Students should check with their Faculty the validity of including original language works.

For works which are reprints of classic original works, the reference should include details of the original date of the work and reprinting details, the suggested elements for such references being:

Author, Initials., Original Year. Title of book. (Imprint/reprint and then year). Place of publication: Publisher.

Keynes, J.M., 1936. The general theory of employment, interest, and money. Reprint 1988. London: Palgrave Macmillian.

An in-text reference for the above example would read:

(Keynes, 1936)

For classical works which have been abridged or introduced by a noted writer.

Leakey, R.E., 1979. The illustrated origin of species. Reprint of On the Origin of species by Charles Darwin, 1859. Abridged and introduced by Richard E. Leakey. London: Faber and Faber.

An in-text reference for the above example would read:

(Leakey, 1979)

With a recommendation to mention Darwin and the original date in the text, but including Leakey as the in-text citation.

2.2.7 E-books and pdfs

E-books available through the University Library

For e-books accessed through a password protected database from the University Library.

The required elements for a reference are:
Author, Initials., Year. Title of book. [e-book] Place of publication: Publisher.

Followed by Available through: Anglia Ruskin University Library website <http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk> [Accesseddate].

Fishman, R., 2005. The rise and fall of suburbia. [e-book] Chester: Castle Press. Available through: Anglia Ruskin University Library website <http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk> [Accessed 12 May 2010].

Carlsen, J. and Charters, S. eds., 2007. Global wine tourism. [e-book] Wallingford: CABI Pub. Available through: Anglia Ruskin University Library website <http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk> [Accessed 9 June 2008].

For an open access e-book freely available over the internet such as through Google books

The required elements for a reference are:

Author, Initials., Year. Title of book. [e-book] Place of publication (if known): Publisher. Followed by Available at: e-book source and web address or URL for the e-book [Accessed date].

Cookson, J. and Church, S. eds., 2007. Leisure and the tourist. [e- book] Wallingford: ABS Publishers. Available at: Google Books <http://booksgoogle.com> [Accessed 9 June 2008].

For an e-book from specific e-readers and other devices such as Kindle or Nook.

The required elements for a reference are:
Author, Initials., Year. Title of book. [e-book type] Place of publication (if available): Publisher. Followed by Available at: e-book source and web address [Accessed date].

Patterson, M., 2012. Lost places in dreams. [Kindle DX version] Transworld Media. Available at: Amazon.co.uk <http://www.amazon.co.uk> [Accessed 9 June 2012].

If you include a quotation from an ebook without page numbers, use the section heading or chapter heading as a guide to locating your quotation, if available.

2.2.8 Pdf documents

For a pdf version of, for example, a Government publication or similar which is freely available:

The required elements for a reference are:
Authorship, Year. Title of document. [type of medium] Place of publication (if known): Publisher. Followed by Available at: include web address or URL for

the actual pdf, where available [Accessed date].

Bank of England, 2008. Inflation Report. [pdf] Bank of England. Available at:
<http://www .bankofengland .c o.uk /pu blic at ions /i nfla tio nrep ort/ir 08n ov. pd f> [Accessed 20 April 2009].

Department of Health, 2008. Health inequalities: progress and next steps. [pdf] London: Department of Health. Available at: <http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/Public ationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH_085307> [Accessed 9 June 2008].

2.2.9 Articles from printed sources – basic journal reference

Use these guidelines for print articles, those you get through InterLibrary Loan, and online articles that have a print equivalent.

The required elements for a reference are:
Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Journal, Volume number (Issue/Part number), Page number(s).

Boughton, J.M., 2002. The Bretton Woods proposal: a brief look. Political Science Quarterly, 42(6), p.564.

Cox, C., 2002. What health care assistants know about clean hands.

Nursing Times, Spring Issue, pp.647-85.

2.2.10 Electronic articles

Reference an e-journal article as print if it is also available in a print version of the journal. This is usually the case where you access an article in pdf format and it uses sequential journal page numbers.

Perry, C., 2001. What health care assistants know about clean hands. Nursing Times, 97(22), pp.63-64.

If you are not sure if there is a print equivalent, add the electronic access information as follows:

2.2.11 Articles from a Library database

For articles accessed through a password protected database from the University Library:

Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Journal, [type of medium] Volume number (Issue/Part number), Page numbers if available. Available through: Anglia Ruskin University Library website <http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk> [Accessed date].

Boughton, J.M., 2002. The Bretton Woods proposal: an in depth look. Political Science Quarterly, [e-journal] 42(6). Available through: Anglia Ruskin University Library website <http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk> [Accessed 12 June 2005].

An example of a Cochrane Review

Katchamart, W., Trudeau, J., Phumethum, V. and Bombardier, C., 2010. Methotrexate monotherapy versus methotrexate combination therapy with non-biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, [online] 4 (CD008495) Available at: <

http://onlinelibrary .wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD008495/abstrac t> [Accessed 6 August 2013].

An example of an early view article from the BMJ

Currie, G.P., Small, I. and Douglas, G., 2013. Long acting β2 agonists in adult asthma. BMJ [e-journal] Early view article: Accepted 20 May 2013, Published 6 August 2013, BMJ2013 ;347:f4662.
Available at:< http://www.bmj.com/content/347/bmj.f4662>

[Accessed 8 August 2013]

2.2.12 Articles publically available on the internet

Articles from web based magazines or journals, including Open Access articles found in institutional repositories.

Authors, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Journal or Magazine, [online] Available at: web address (quote the exact URL for the article) [Accessed date].

Kipper, D., 2008. Japan's new dawn. Popular Science and Technology, [online] Available at:<http://www.popsci.com/popsci37b144110vgn/html> [Accessed22 June 2009].

2.2.13 Articles with DOIs

You can choose to use the DOI (Digital Object Identifier) instead of the format/location/access date. The DOI is a permanent identifier and replaces a permanent web address for online articles. They are often found at the start/end of an article or on the database landing page for the article. Not all articles are assigned a DOI. If an article does not have a DOI, use one of the other e-journal article formats.

Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Journal,[e-journal] Volume number (Issue/Part number), Page numbers if available. DOI

Boon, S., Johnston, B. and Webber, S., 2007. A phenomenographic study of English faculty's conceptions of information literacy. Journal of Documentation, [e-journal] 63(2), pp.204 – 228. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/00220410710737187.

Goodall, A.H., 2006. Should top universities be led by top researchers and are they? A citations analysis. Journal of Documentation, [e- journal] 62(3), pp.388 – 411. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/00220410610666529.

2.2.14 Journal abstract from a database

For a journal abstract from a database where you have been unable to access the full article, the required elements for a reference are:

Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Journal, [type of medium] Volume number (Issue/Part number), Page numbers if available. Abstract only. Available through: Source [Accessed date].

Boughton, J.M., 2002. The Bretton Woods proposal: a brief look. Political Science Quarterly, [e-journal] 42(6). Abstract only. Available through: Anglia Ruskin University Library website <http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk> [Accessed 12 June 2005].

Every effort should be made to read the article in full if you intend to use this work as supporting evidence in an academic submission.

2.2.15 Newspaper articles

For newspaper articles the required elements for a reference are: Author, Initials., Year. Title of article or column header. Full Title of

Newspaper, Day and month before page number and column line. Slapper, G., 2005. Corporate manslaughter: new issues for lawyers.

The Times, 3 Sep. p.4b.

(In the page reference. p.4b - “4” indicates that the article is on the fourth page of the newspaper, columns of print on a page are labelled left to right alphabetically, so in this example “b” indicates that this is the second column of newsprint across the page from left to right.)

An example of corporate authorship where the newspaper article authorship is not stated.

Times, 2005. Corporate manslaughter: responses from the legal profession (Editorial comments),
The Times, 8 Sep. p.4b.

2.2.16 Online newspaper articles

For newspaper articles found in online newspapers, the required elements for a reference are:

Author or corporate author, Year. Title of document or page. Name of newspaper, [type of medium] additional date information. Available at: < url> [Accessed date].

Chittenden, M., Rogers, L. and Smith, D., 2003. Focus: ‘Targetitis ails NHS. Times Online, [online] 1 June. Available at: <http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/scotland/art1138006.ece> [Accessed 17 March 2005].

Coney, J., 2009. Is this the start of a new home loan war? HSBC vows to lend £1billion to homebuyers with 10% deposits. Daily Mail, [online] (Last updated 9.47 AM on 09th April 2009). Available at: <http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1168461/Is-start-new-home- loan-war-HSBC-vows-lend-1billion- homebuyers-10-deposits.html> [Accessed on 20 April 2009].

An in-text reference for the above examples would read:

(Chittenden, Rogers and Smith, 2003)

(Coney, 2009)

 

3. USING OTHER SOURCE TYPES

For more information on citing more specific sources, such as legislation, reports, electronic sources, images, music, or unpublished works, authors are directed to: https://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm

 

 

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  2. The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF document file format.
  3. Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  4. The text is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  5. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
  6. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions in Ensuring a Blind Review have been followed.
 

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